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Sách The Art of Game Design

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#1
Table of Lenses xvii
Acknowledgments xxi
Hello .xxiii
1 In the Beginning, There Is the
Designer . 1
Magic Words . 1
What Skills Does a Game Designer Need? .2
The Most Important Skill 4
The Five Kinds of Listening 5
The Secret of the Gifted 6
2 The Designer Creates an Experience 9
The Game Is Not the Experience .10
Is This Unique to Games? .11
Three Practical Approaches to Chasing Rainbows .12
Introspection: Powers, Perils, and Practice .14
Dissect Your Feelings .17
Defeating Heisenberg .18
Essential Experience 20
All That’s Real Is What You Feel .21
3 The Experience Rises Out of a
Game . 23
A Rant About Definitions .24
So, What Is a Game? 26
vii
TABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF CONTENTS
ix
A Short History of Software Engineering .81
Risk Assessment and Prototyping .83
Eight Tips for Productive Prototyping .86
Closing the Loop .91
How Much is Enough? .94
8 The Game is Made for a Player . 97
Einstein’s Violin .98
Project Yourself 99
Demographics 99
The Medium is the Misogynist? 102
Psychographics .108
9 The Experience is in the Player’s
Mind . 113
Modeling .115
Focus .118
Empathy 123
Imagination 124
Motivation 126
Judgment 127
10 Some Elements are Game
Mechanics . 129
Mechanic 1: Space .130
Mechanic 2: Objects, Attributes, and States 136
Mechanic 3: Actions 140
Mechanic 4: Rules .144
Mechanic 5: Skill .150
Mechanic 6: Chance 153TABLE OF CONTENTS
x
11 Game Mechanics Must be in
Balance 171
The Twelve Most Common Types of Game Balance 172
Game Balancing Methodologies 201
Balancing Game Economies 203
Dynamic Game Balancing 205
The Big Picture 205
12 Game Mechanics Support Puzzles . 207
The Puzzle of Puzzles 208
Aren’t Puzzles Dead? .209
Good Puzzles .211
A Final Piece .219
13 Players Play Games Through an
Interface 221
Breaking it Down .223
The Loop of Interaction .228
Channels of Information 234
Other Interface Tips .240
14 Experiences Can be Judged by
Their Interest Curves . 245
My First Lens 246
Interest Curves 247
Patterns Inside Patterns .250
What Comprises Interest? .253
Interest Factor Examples .258
Putting It All Together 259TABLE OF CONTENTS
xi
15 One Kind of Experience Is the Story . 261
Story/Game Duality .262
The Myth of Passive Entertainment 263
The Dream 264
The Reality 264
The Problems .266
The Dream Reborn 270
Story Tips for Game Designers 270
16 Story and Game Structures can
be Artfully Merged with Indirect
Control . 283
The Feeling of Freedom .284
Indirect Control Method #1: Constraints .285
Indirect Control Method #2: Goals .286
Indirect Control Method #3: Interface 286
Indirect Control Method #4: Visual Design .287
Indirect Control Method #5: Characters .292
Indirect Control Method #6: Music 292
Collusion .293
17 Stories and Games Take Place in
Worlds 299
Transmedia Worlds 300
The Power of Pokemon 301
Properties of Transmedia Worlds 303
What Successful Transmedia Worlds Have in Common .305
18 Worlds Contain Characters . 309
The Nature of Game Characters .310TABLE OF CONTENTS
xii
Avatars .312
Creating Compelling Game Characters .314
19 Worlds Contain Spaces . 329
The Purpose of Architecture 330
Organizing your Game Space 330
Christopher Alexander is a Genius 334
Real vs. Virtual Architecture 338
Level Design .343
20 The Look and Feel of a World Is
Defined by Its Aesthetics . 345
Monet Refuses the Operation .346
The Value of Aesthetics 347
Learning to See .348
How to Let Aesthetics Guide your Design 349
How Much Is Enough? 350
Use Audio 351
Balancing Art and Technology 352
21 Some Games are Played with
Other Players . 353
We Are Not Alone .354
Why We Play With Others 354
22 Other Players Sometimes Form
Communities . 357
More than just Other Players .358
Ten Tips for Strong Communities .359
The Challenge of Griefing .368
The Future of Game Communities .370TABLE OF CONTENTS
xiii
23 The Designer Usually Works
with a Team 371
The Secret of Successful Teamwork 372
Designing Together .375
Team Communication 376
24 The Team Sometimes Communicates
Through Documents . 381
The Myth of the Game Design Document 382
The Purpose of Documents 382
Types of Game Documents 383
So, Where Do I Start? .387
25 Good Games Are Created Through
Playtesting . 389
Playtesting 390
My Terrible Secret 391
Playtest Question the First: Why? .392
Playtest Question the Second: Who? 393
Playtest Question the Third: Where? .394
Playtest Question the Fourth: What? .396
Playtest Question the Fifth: How? 396
26 The Team Builds a Game
with Technology . 403
Technology, At Last 404
Foundational vs. Decorational .405
The Hype Cycle .409
The Innovator’s Dilemma 410TABLE OF CONTENTS
xiv
The Singularity 411
Look Into Your Crystal Ball 412
27 Your Game Will Probably Have
a Client . 415
Who Cares What the Client Thinks? .416
Coping with Bad Suggestions .417
Not That Rock 418
The Three Layers of Desire 419
Firenza, 1498 419
28 The Designer Gives the Client
a Pitch 423
Why Me? 424
A Negotiation of Power .424
The Hierarchy of Ideas 425
Twelve Tips for a Successful Pitch 425
29 The Designer and Client Want
the Game to Make a Profit 433
Love and Money .434
Know Your Business Model .435
Units Sold 436
Breakeven .436
Know the Top Sellers .437
Learn the Language 437
30 Games Transform Their Players . 441
How Do Games Change Us? 442
Can Games Be Good For You? .442TABLE OF CONTENTS
xv
Can Games Be Bad For You? .448
Experiences 451
31 Designers Have Certain
Responsibilities 453
The Danger of Obscurity .454
Being Accountable 455
Your Hidden Agenda 456
The Secret Hidden in Plain Sight 456
The Ring .457
32 Each Designer has a Motivation . 459
The Deepest Theming 460
33 Goodbye . 463
All Good Things 464
Endnotes .465
Bibliography .477
Index .481
 
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